Dasharajna: The Battle of Ten Kings (Harappa Trilogy Book 3) by Shankar Kashyap

 

An epic Indian battle brought to life by Shankar Kashyap

Yet again Shankar Kashyap has combined thorough and detailed research, with his amazing ability to tell a fantastic story and written this the third book in the Harappa trilogy – Dasharajna – Battle of Ten Kings.

Traditional history books are sometimes difficult to get into, however the author has overcome this by using in this Harappa series the character of Upaas, originally a trainee physician, his friends, and wife Lopa. These characters and the people they meet, rich and poor, give the reader a real insight into what it was like to live in this period of history.

Set in the third millennium BCE, the legend of the Battle of Ten Kings can be easily determined to have taken place on what is now the banks of the River Ravi, in what is now the Punjab, Haryana and north-east Pakistan. The traditions, laws and everyday lives are fascinating to read as a wonderful background to the epic story which is the Battle of Ten Kings, a battle between King Sudas and the alliance between ten to twelve kings. The alliance was forged because the descendants of King Yayathi were unhappy that the central part of Bharatha was given by the king to his youngest son Puru, and not to one of his elder brothers.

The years have passed and Upaas now moves with Lopa and their baby Atreya to Ila to become the Royal Physician to King Sudas. Ila is a great capital city known as the centre of the world and stories of Upaas the physician of Harappa are well known, and he and his family are warmly welcomed by Sage Visishta.

However it is soon apparent that there is great unrest, the opposing forces are grouping together, and adding in numbers. There are rumours in Ila that the enemy has sixty thousand soldiers, fired by their rulers united sense of past injustice, intent on winning the battle over King Sudas.

As the opposing forces gather on the banks of the River Parushni (Riva) it is apparent to all that this is going to be no ordinary battle. Then begins this epic war with soldiers and the king fighting bravely, and Upaas tending the wounded. All would seem to be lost until man is taught an important lesson, one they should never forget….

Wow, is all I can say to this amazing story. Whether you are interested in Indian history, enjoy reading about life in times gone by, or are just looking for a totally fascinating story, this is the book for you, and I highly recommend, it.

 

About the Author:

Shankar N Kashyap is a Consultant Orthopaedic Surgeon working at Queen Elizabeth Hospital, Gateshead, UK. He was subjected to a life changing ordeal with potential for disastrous consequences. Some of his colleagues jealous of his popularity, success as an innovative and extremely talented surgeon, cooked up spurious allegations against him and reported him to the regulatory body, the GMC. He had to face the prolonged ordeal of a trial conducted by a group of incompetent individuals with no knowledge of his work in the hospital. He faced destruction of an internationally renowned reputation through this trial.
He has published extensively in peer reviewed scientific journals over the years, including a Thesis. This is his first foray into literary field.
The traumatic events of the trial made him write his first book, A Kangaroo Court published in Kindle as well as print format through Createspace.
He has extensive knowledge of History, particularly of Indus Valley civilisation, Mesopotamia and Elam. He has used this knowledge to write a series of books set in third millenium BCE in the Near East and Middle east. The first book of the Harappa series was released in November 2013. It is full of action, adventure and sorcery revolving around real characters, events and places in the Indus Valley and the Vedic scriptures. The second book of the series, The Fall of Shuruppak takes our hero to the shores of Mesopotamia. He gets involved with internal strife of Sumer and helps the famed emperor Gilgamesh in his pursuit of immortality. He, along with his friends, helps Gilgamesh when the Shuruppak is attacked by the Gutians and later witness the great flood which nearly ends the Mesopotamian civilisation. This was released in October 2014. The third book of the Harappa series, The Battle of Ten Kings is due for release in 2015. It deals with the epic battle of good against evil as depicted in the seventh book of Rigveda. If the outcome of the battle was any different, both the great epics of India – Ramayana and Mahabharat – may not have occured or if they did, they would have been completely different.
He lives in Newcastle upon Tyne, UK with his wife and three children.

 

About the Book:

The seventh book of Rigveda describes how, the descendants of the four brothers of Puru join forces with several other kings to form a confederacy of ten kings against Sudas. Sage Vishwamitra falls out with Sudas and joins the confederacy of ten kings. They attack Sudas and a bitter battle ensues on the banks of river Parushni. It was a one sided battle on the face of it, with a massive army of ten kings attacking a smaller army of Sudas. The skill of Sudas with the help of sage Vasishta, and timely intervention of weather helps him to an unlikely victory. Astronomical references within the Rigveda place this battle around the middle of third millennium BCE

“’Dasharajna – The Battle of Ten Kings’ is a wonderful gift from the author to his readers. But let me warn you – its not a book for passing readers. If you adore ancient Indian history and have honest respect towards a writer’s extensive background work, then this is a book you must not miss.

One of the most difficult tasks in writing is to deep dive in the realms of history and recreate that in the form of fiction. Dr. Kashyap did exactly that in this book and I must appreciate the publisher for creating such a wonderful cover to match the standard of the contents. The holistic package of the book including cover, formatting, paper quality, fonts etc create a quick attraction to flip through the pages.

The book is bound to be liked by avid readers of both fiction and non-fiction genres (esp mythology/ historic fiction). Very few books in the history of Indian literature present us with a thorough account of pre-Ramayana & Mahabharata saga. Dasharajna did it so keenly – It explores an unaccounted segment of ancient India, a result of 25 years of extensive research by the author. Hats off !!

The other point that sets the book apart is the consistency of the characters. Most of the characters are relevant even in the modern world as well – Their conversations sound authentic; their reactions seem logical and most importantly their presentation is so flawless.”
Reetwika Banerjee, Goodreads Review

 

Dasharajna is available from Amazon in Paperback https://www.amazon.co.uk/Battle-Ten-Kings-Dasharajna-Harappa/dp/8193171411/ref=tmm_pap_swatch_0?_encoding=UTF8&qid=1515750985&sr=8-3

and Kindle format https://www.amazon.co.uk/Dasharajna-Battle-Kings-Harappa-Trilogy-ebook/dp/B075YSWTCC/ref=tmm_kin_swatch_0?_encoding=UTF8&qid=1515750985&sr=8-3

 

and Barnes & Noble in Paperback https://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/the-battle-of-ten-kings-dr-shankar-kashyap/1123777516?ean=9788193171417

 

Fall of Shuruppak: Harappa 2 (Harappa Trilogy) by Shankar Kashyap

 

A must read for anyone interested in Indian history.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

This fascinating journey into Indian history is set in the third millennium BCE. Through the author’s thorough investigation into this era, and extremely descriptive writing, these splendid days of the Mesopotamian and Indus Valley civilisations are brought to life for his readers.

In this the second book of the Harappa series we join the friends Upaas (a physician), his wife Lopa, Parthava and Elaamite Prince Shushan as they continue their journeys, travelling far and wide through unknown lands satiating their thirst for knowledge.

In this adventure they find themselves agreeing to help the grief stricken Emperor Gilgamesh of Sumer find the great Sage Ziusudra. Gilgamesh believes that the sage will answer a question he is compelled to ask, and through the answer he will find an end to his torment.

Armed with the help and advice of Sage Vasishta, magic potions, and amulets for protection they set off on a quest unlike any other they have undertaken. Their travels take them through unknown lands, where they battle mythical beasts, demons, and many unimaginable creatures, but will they succeed and will Gilgamesh find the answer he seeks?

After seeing the Sage they return to Shuruppak as war breaks out, and with battles raging and thousands lying dead or dying they escape by ship, taking those they can. Little do they know that a higher being has decided that mankind needs a lesson, and what happens next is one of the most well-known of all biblical stories…

What I love about this story is that for those of us who are not Indian, yet have a great interest in Indian history, the legend behind the grief and torment of Gilgamesh, and others, interwoven into this epic adventure, adding immeasurably to the enjoyment, and fascination of this book.

I am looking forward to reading Dasharajna: The Battle of Ten Kings (Harappa Trilogy Book 3).

About the Author: 

Shankar N Kashyap is a Consultant Orthopaedic Surgeon working at Queen Elizabeth Hospital, Gateshead, UK. He was subjected to a life changing ordeal with potential for disastrous consequences. Some of his colleagues jealous of his popularity, success as an innovative and extremely talented surgeon, cooked up spurious allegations against him and reported him to the regulatory body, the GMC. He had to face the prolonged ordeal of a trial conducted by a group of incompetent individuals with no knowledge of his work in the hospital. He faced destruction of an internationally renowned reputation through this trial.
He has published extensively in peer reviewed scientific journals over the years, including a Thesis. This is his first foray into literary field.
The traumatic events of the trial made him write his first book, A Kangaroo Court published in Kindle as well as print format through Createspace.
He has extensive knowledge of History, particularly of Indus Valley civilisation, Mesopotamia and Elam. He has used this knowledge to write a series of books set in third millenium BCE in the Near East and Middle east. The first book of the Harappa series was released in November 2013. It is full of action, adventure and sorcery revolving around real characters, events and places in the Indus Valley and the Vedic scriptures. The second book of the series, The Fall of Shuruppak takes our hero to the shores of Mesopotamia. He gets involved with internal strife of Sumer and helps the famed emperor Gilgamesh in his pursuit of immortality. He, along with his friends, helps Gilgamesh when the Shuruppak is attacked by the Gutians and later witness the great flood which nearly ends the Mesopotamian civilisation. This was released in October 2014. The third book of the Harappa series, The Battle of Ten Kings is due for release in 2015. It deals with the epic battle of good against evil as depicted in the seventh book of Rigveda. If the outcome of the battle was any different, both the great epics of India – Ramayana and Mahabharat – may not have occured or if they did, they would have been completely different.
He lives in Newcastle upon Tyne, UK with his wife and three children.

About the Book: 

The third millennium BCE saw the glory days of the Mesopotamian and the Indus Valley civilisations. There were extensive trade links between the two places despite the fact they were hundreds of miles apart. The great Epic of Gilgamesh from Sumer is now well-known and often considered as the basis of the story of the biblical flood.
The Fall of Shuruppak traces the adventures of the hero, Upaas as he travels across to Sumer with the famed Sage Vasishta. Along with his friend Shushun, the Elaamite prince in disguise, he helps the emperor in his quest to find Sage Ziusudra. Follow our daredevil physician as he fights his way through this epic adventure, while seeking answers to his own questions about life. As the group of travellers move from one peril to another, we recognise our own hidden desires in their search for truth and immortality.
The author has used archaeological and literary evidence of both civilisations to bring to life the great untold stories of trade links between the two.

Fall of Shuruppak: Harappa 2 is available from Amazon in Paperback https://www.amazon.co.uk/Harappa-Fall-Shuruppak-Shankar-Kashyap/dp/1549930222/ref=tmm_pap_swatch_0?_encoding=UTF8&qid=1512036976&sr=8-5

and Kindle format https://www.amazon.co.uk/Fall-Shuruppak-Harappa-Trilogy-ebook/dp/B075X1HBT2/ref=tmm_kin_swatch_0?_encoding=UTF8&qid=1512036976&sr=8-5

and

Barnes & Noble in Paperback https://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/harappa-2-mr-shankar-kashyap/1120429649?ean=9788192749136

 

Lure of Soma: Harappa 1 by Shankar Kashyap

 

A fascinating glimpse into the Harappan Civilization.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The author’s vast knowledge of Hindu history and literature makes this enthralling novel set in the third millennium BCE fascinating reading. Indeed although a work of fiction, the story is based around real life characters and events which took place in the Near East, and Middle East at that time.

The Harappan (or Indus Valley) Civilization was the biggest empire of the time. Its lands stretched from the river Indus and Hindu Kush Mountains in the west, to the Ganges Yamuna doab in the east, the Himalayas in the north and the Arabian Sea in the south.

The story is told by the main character Upashantha (Upaas), who is a trainee physician and the son of Angirasa, the chief architect who designed the beautiful city of Harappa, known as the City of Gold.

Through Upaas’s eyes, and the author’s wonderfully descriptive writing, we find ourselves transported back through time to this golden era in Harappan history.

The Harappans live well, are prosperous, safe, protected, and welcome visitors and merchants keen to trade with them. However, for others life is not so fortunate, in Ariana the nine rivers have dried up, the people are suffering, and the crops are failing. Matriya, has had to watch his family and those around him struggle and is angry, and so after failing to persuade the Elders of Sistan to use their magical powers to change the course of the river Sindu (Indus), a resentful and unhappy Matriya decides to take fate into his own hands.

Eventually, after much studying under a  yogi who knows how to control nature, Matriya learns the necessary powers himself, however, although he wants to move the course of the mighty Sindu river so his people’s lands are fertile again, he also has an ulterior motive, he is doing it for selfish reasons, he seeks glory for himself.

As this story unfolds Upaas finds himself called upon to help the Elders of the Council and Sages of Harappa, and is sent down perilous paths to save the City of Gold from war, and the spell of the rogue Magus.

I was fascinated by the magical Soma plant which was revered as a God by the Harappan civilization, and grown in a secret location known only to a few. Its magical powers are as vital to the Magus, and the Harappa people in this story, as they were at the time.

This is a great action packed adventure which is laced with magic and sorcery, and am looking forward to reading the second in this trilogy, Harappa 2:  Fall of Shuruppak.

 

About the Author: 

Shankar N Kashyap is a consultant Orthopaedic Surgeon working in Gateshead, UK. Some of his colleagues jealous of his popularity, success and talent, decided to cook up spurious charges against him and reported to the regulatory body, the GMC. He faced an three year ordeal of trial by incompetent individuals who were not only corrupt but completely devoid of any knowledge of the work he did in the hospital. He has written his experiences in his book “A Kangaroo Court” on Createspace. The book is an invaluable guide to all doctors not only in the UK, but across the world.

He is extensively read with wide knowledge of history of near east and middle east. He is presently writing a series of books based in Indus Valley and Mesopotamia around third millennium BCE. First book Harappa: The Lure of Soma has been released through Palimpsest India and available on amazon as well as on Alibris websites. It was released in Delhi in October 2013 and has excellent reviews by renowned authors such as Graham Hancock and David Frawley. The second book of the series – Harappa: The fall of Shuruppak is due for release in the spring of 2014.

He lives in Newcastle upon Tyne, UK with his wife and three children.

Author’s Website: http://shankarkashyap.com/
About the Book:
Myth is the smoke of history and as the years pass the smoke, which has hung for millennia over the Indus Valley civilisation is clearing. Trowel and brush investigation in the 1920s by Mortimer Wheeler and now scientific research, which relies on aerial photography and computer modelling, has confirmed that an early urban civilisation appeared in that area slightly before the Sumerian and Egyptian ones appeared. Teams of scholars from every continent have confirmed that the Indus, and its daughter and cousin rivers, for about 1,400 years supported extensive urban settlements, which then disappeared, lost under inundations of mud and dust. In these river valleys, in terrains of clay and water under a relentless sun and cloud-free starry skies. Mathematics, town planning, pharmaceuticals and philosophy flourished and then disappeared almost without trace. Papers on archaeological investigation are appearing but in Harappa, Shankar Kashyap provides a different service. Instead of asking us to piece together a complicated scientific narrative about what lies on, or just under, the earth he does what a Vedic bard would have done he tells a story, which has the features of a rip roaring Bollywood film. His hero, predictably because Shankar Kashyap is a surgeon, is Upaas, a trainee doctor. Upaas describes municipal government, pupilship with a yogi, exploding arrows, kingship, an attempt to re-route rivers with thought, a battle in a hidden ravine as a watching eagle hovers overhead, international trade and horsemanship. There is a doe eyed maiden who flirts in shallow water using her toes and a villain who seems to lack the virtue of rising early without complaint. This novel is well grounded in 5000 years of Hindu literature but it has a modern slant. Today floods threaten, traders quarrel, religious niceties cause children to starve and wail, drone planes bomb weddings and an interrogatory Eagle hovers watching.
And from all Amazon sites worldwide.

New Release the Harappa Trilogy by Shankar Kashyap

 

 

New Release Today on Kindle

Harappa Trilogy

by Shankar Kashyap

 

 

Book One: The Lure of Soma

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Myth is the smoke of history and as the years pass the smoke, which has hung for millennia over the Indus Valley civilisation is clearing. Trowel and brush investigation in the 1920s by Mortimer Wheeler and now scientific research, which relies on aerial photography and computer modelling, has confirmed that an early urban civilisation appeared in that area slightly before the Sumerian and Egyptian ones appeared. Teams of scholars from every continent have confirmed that the Indus and Sarasvati rivers, for about 1,400 years supported extensive urban settlements, which then disappeared, lost under inundations of mud and dust. Mathematics, town planning, pharmaceuticals and philosophy flourished and then disappeared almost without trace.

 Rigveda, is probably the oldest scripture mankind has known and has defied scientists for centuries on its authorship.  Author brings the Rigvedic characters and events in Indus-Sarasvati valley to life in this book.  The hero, Upaas, a trainee doctor, describes municipal government, pupilship with a yogi, exploding arrows, kingship, an attempt to re-route rivers with thought, a battle in a hidden ravine as a watching eagle hovers overhead, international trade and horsemanship. There is a doe eyed maiden and a villain who seems to lack the virtue of the risis. This novel is well grounded in 5000 years of Hindu literature but it has a modern slant.

Synopsis:

I have used existing archaeological evidence along with known historical evidence in writing this book.  Rigveda talks about several conflicts among the descendants of the emperor Bharata and the Avestan scriptures talk about the conflicts between the Aryans and the Dasyus.  There have always been fierce debates about who exactly these Aryans were and the Daevas mentioned in the Avestan scriptures.   I have used some poetic license to accommodate the dates and times of various individuals and events to suit the story telling.  The book tries to portray the life of ordinary people during the period of Harappans, while trying to tell the tale of the priestly kings, Magi, Rishis and Sages of the great Indus Valley Civilisation during the middle of third millennium BCE.  This is the story of our hero, Upaas, a trainee physician from Harappa.  It is a story of a young man growing up, falling in love, getting involved in adventures and finally fighting for the city he loves most – Harappa.  The story shows the human elements of people around him.  He faces friendship, love, hate, jealousy, treachery and deceit in day to day life.  There is generous sprinkling of magic and sorcery.  As the country of Ariana, west of Hindu Kush dries up, the Avestans facing with near extinction take up arms against their neighbours to obtain the precious Soma.  The tactics used include deceit, sorcery and finally a war between the Meluhhans and Avestans

The Soma plant has been the centrepiece of several hymns in the Vedic scriptures.  It is a plant still not accurately recognized.  The Vedic people revered it as a God, drank the extract from the stalk of the plant, used the plant for medicinal purposes and it

is supposed to have magical properties.  There are hymns composed to the Soma within the Vedas.  The Avestan had a similar plant and called it Haoma and their scriptures also revered the plant for its spiritual properties.  Vedas describe it as growing in a sacred mountain around a sacred lake (Mount Mujavant and lake Sharynavat). Avestan scriptures describe a similar sacred mountain and a sacred lake in Sistan where the Haoma plant grew.  Similar to the Soma of Indus valley, we still do not know exactly what this plant was as it disappeared at the same time as the Harappans.  It was considered the mushroom, Amanita Muscaria for a long time because of the ”hallucinogenic” effects the Soma was said to produce when consumed.  This may be a misconception by the writers who tried to explain the events described in Vedic scriptures and the powers of ancient sages.

Available from Amazon in Kindle format: https://www.amazon.co.uk/Harappa-Lure-Soma-Trilogy-Book-ebook/dp/B075Z7SHJK/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1506788042&sr=8-1&keywords=lure+of+soma+by+shankar+kashyap

 

 

Book Two: The Fall of Shuruppak

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Third millennium BCE saw the glory days of the Mesopotamian and the Indus Valley civilisations.   There were extensive trade links between the two despite the fact they were hundreds of miles apart.  The great Epic of Gilgamesh from Sumer is now well-known and often considered as the basis of the story of the biblical flood.

Fall of Shuruppak  traces the adventures of the hero, Upaas  as he travels  across to Sumer with the famed Sage Vasishta.  The legend of sage Vasishta sailing to the “thousand pillared temple of Varuna” is brought to life in this gripping novel. Along with his friend Shushun, the Elaamite prince in disguise, he helps the emperor Gilgamesh in his quest to find Sage Ziusudra.   Follow our daredevil physician as he fights his way through this epic adventure, while seeking answers to his own questions about life. As the group of travellers move from one peril to another, we recognise our own hidden desires in their search for truth and immortality. 

The author has used archaeological and literary evidence of both civilisations to bring to life the great untold stories of trade links between the two.

 

Synopsis:

Harappans appear to have ventured far and wide with their trade, both on land and sea.  Harappan settlements spread as far west as Shortugai in Afghanistan at the head of river Oxus, which was the centre of raw materials such as Lapis Lazuli, Gold and Silver for the Harappan artisans.  Harappan seals, jewellery and pottery have been found in Elam (present day Iran), Egypt, and Sumer.  Jewellery found in Queen Puabi’s tomb had all the hallmarks of Harappan artisans.  The cylindrical Carnelian beads with central core drilled after hours of careful work is typical of the Harappans.

Cylindrical seal of Shu-ilishu, the translator has the typical humped bull on one side and cuneiform text on the other side.  Archaeologists agree that he must have been a translator of Sumerian and Akkadian into Meluhhan language.  He is placed to have lived in Lagash around the middle of third millennium BCE.  There is archaeological evidence of Meluhhan enclaves around Lagash.

Sargon the great who ruled most of Mesopotamia from around 2300 BCE, boasts of ships from Meluhha, Dilmun and Magan docking in the port of his capital city, Akkad.  The Meluhhans obviously had marine trading links with Akkad for a long time with some of them settling down in Sumer.  Despite elaborate description of the city of Akkad in several tablets in cuneiform texts, the city eludes detection.

Epic of Gilgamesh is a well-known story with an almost entire story written and transcribed from cuneiform texts.  Emperor Gilgamesh befriends an uncouth Enkidu from the deep forests and a deep friendship ensues.  The epic is that of undying love, sacrifice and heroism.  Enkidu is mortally injured fighting a -mythical demon and only a meluhhan sage can save him.

Available from Amazon in Kindle format: https://www.amazon.co.uk/Fall-Shuruppak-Harappa-Trilogy-ebook/dp/B075X1HBT2/ref=sr_1_1?s=digital-text&ie=UTF8&qid=1506860367&sr=1-1&keywords=fall+of+shuruppak+by+shankar+kashyap

 

 

Book Three: The Battle of Ten Kings (Dasharajna)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The seventh book of Rigveda describes the story of an epic battle between Sudasa of Bharatas and Kavi Cayamana of the Anus, leading a confederacy of ten disgruntled kings.  It takes place on the banks of the River Ravi.  It is also a battle of wits and power between the two of the most powerful sages of Vedic times – Vasishta and Vishwamitra. 

This is the age-old story of enmity between the clans set in motion by hunger for power which is so familiar to readers of the great epics of India – Ramayana and Mahabharata.  The enmity had been brewing for centuries starting when Emperor Yayati divided up his kingdom into five quarters –  Turvasha gets the land to the southeast, Druhyu, the  Gandhara in the west,  Yadu the south,  Anu  the north Punjab; and to the youngest son, Puru the center (Sarasvati region,) as the supreme king of Earth. 

It is a battle whose result is paradigm shifting in that the outcome decided the future of the two great epics of India.

Extensive research into the Vedic scriptures and archaeological evidence have helped create a fascinating insight into the geography and history of an iconic battle

Synopsis: 

Book six of Rigveda describes a battle between King Sudas and “ten kings.”  It is a confederacy of ten to twelve kings compiled by disgruntled descendants of King Yayathi’s sons who felt hard done by when the ageing king gives the central

part of the great Bharatha kingdom to the youngest son, Puru over the elder four brothers – Yadu, Turvasu, Druhyu and Anu.   King Sudas is brought up and trained by sage Vishwamitra and Vasishta.  Vishwaimtra falls out with the king and the senior sage Vasishta and joins the confederacy of ten kings.  A bitter battle ensues on the banks of River Parushni (present day Ravi) between the forces of King Sudas, highly outnumbered by the huge army of “sixty six thousand” of the confederacy.  God Indra intervenes and takes the side of “righteous Sudas,” and a flash flood destroys most of the army of the confederacy.

While there is no archaeological evidence of the battle or the actors within it, there is enough evidence within the Rigveda itself to place the event around the third millennium BCE.  River Parushni is easily identifiable as the present day Ravi and the kingdom to be the present day Punjab, Haryana and parts of northeast Pakistan with seven rivers.   This epic is considered by many to be the third epic of India, after the great epics of Mahabharata and Ramayana.  Descendants of king Puru for the famous Kuru dynasty who are the actors within the great battle of Mahabharata.  This battle has often been used by the proponents of the Aryan Invasion theory as proof of mighty Aryans invading India and destroying the Harappan civilisation.  It is claimed that they brought the horses and Iron weapons to destroy the great Harappan empire.

Available from Amazon in Kindle format: https://www.amazon.co.uk/Dasharajna-Battle-Kings-Harappa-Trilogy-ebook/dp/B075YSWTCC/ref=sr_1_1?s=digital-text&ie=UTF8&qid=1506788203&sr=1-1&keywords=Dasharajna+by+shankar+kashyap 

 

About the Author:

 

 

 

 

 

 

Shankar N Kashyap is a Consultant Orthopaedic Surgeon working at Queen Elizabeth Hospital, Gateshead, UK. He was subjected to a life changing ordeal with potential for disastrous consequences. Some of his colleagues jealous of his popularity, success as an innovative and extremely talented surgeon, cooked up spurious allegations against him and reported him to the regulatory body, the GMC. He had to face the prolonged ordeal of a trial conducted by a group of incompetent individuals with no knowledge of his work in the hospital. He faced destruction of an internationally renowned reputation through this trial.

He has published extensively in peer reviewed scientific journals over the years, including a Thesis. This is his first foray into literary field.
The traumatic events of the trial made him write his first book, A Kangaroo Court published in Kindle as well as print format through Createspace.

He has extensive knowledge of History, particularly of Indus Valley civilisation, Mesopotamia and Elam. He has used this knowledge to write a series of books set in third millenium BCE in the Near East and Middle east. The first book of the Harappa series was released in November 2013. It is full of action, adventure and sorcery revolving around real characters, events and places in the Indus Valley and the Vedic scriptures. The second book of the series, The Fall of Shuruppak takes our hero to the shores of Mesopotamia. He gets involved with internal strife of Sumer and helps the famed emperor Gilgamesh in his pursuit of immortality. He, along with his friends, helps Gilgamesh when the Shuruppak is attacked by the Gutians and later witness the great flood which nearly ends the Mesopotamian civilisation. This was released in October 2014. The third book of the Harappa series, The Battle of Ten Kings is due for release in 2015. It deals with the epic battle of good against evil as depicted in the seventh book of Rigveda. If the outcome of the battle was any different, both the great epics of India – Ramayana and Mahabharat – may not have occured or if they did, they would have been completely different.

He lives in Newcastle upon Tyne, UK with his wife and three children.

Author’s Website: http://shankarkashyap.wixsite.com/harappa-series